Information

Why Neuroinformatics? - A video about the INCF

Why does neuroscience need neuroinformatics? Watch this 3 min video to find out! The mission of the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) is to facilitate the work of neuroscientists around the world, and to catalyze and coordinate the global development of neuroinformatics. 

Prof Gary Egan, Director of Monash Biomedical Imaging, Dr Allan Jones, CEO of the Allen Institute for Brain Science, Dr Sean Hill, Executive Director of the INCF, and Prof Paul Bonnington, Director of the Monash eResearch Centre, at the Launch of the Victorian node of the INCF.

Prof Gary Egan, Director of Monash Biomedical Imaging, Dr Allan Jones, CEO of the Allen Institute for Brain Science, Dr Sean Hill, Executive Director of the INCF, and Prof Paul Bonnington, Director of the Monash eResearch Centre, at the Launch of the Victorian node of the INCF.

INCF Vic Node Launched

The Victorian Node of the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) was launched on Friday 22nd February 2013, established by Monash University with MASSIVE support together with The University of Melbourne through the Victorian Life Sciences Computational Initiative (VLSCI). Aims of the node include developing data management and analytic tools for neuroscience informatics.

See gallery. 

DTI tractography of the human brain.

DTI tractography of the human brain.

About the Victorian Node of the INCF

The Victorian Node of the INCF has been established to support, coordinate and promote neuroinformatics in Victoria, Australia.

Read more. 

Blog

Blog

The INCF Short Course: Introduction to Neuroinformatics from the Leiden Neuroinformatics Congress is now available online

The $20 million ARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function (CBIF) led by Professor Gary Egan will support neuroscience researchers tackling the challenging problems involved in understanding how the human brain works. The centre will combine techniques for analysing brain anatomy and physiology with advanced computational techniques, to uncover the fundamental principles of brain function. (Announcement)

Prof Gary Egan demonstrated MASSIVE and the Characterisation Virtual Laboratory at SfN. What the video here. 

Prof Gary Egan will be presenting:

The Multi-modal Australian ScienceS Imaging and Visualisation Environment (MASSIVE) high performance computing infrastructure: applications in neuroscience and neuroinformatics research.

Compumedics and Monash Biomedical Imaging (MBI) are hosting a series of courses around "Methods in Neuroscience".

Australian presentations at the Neuroinformatics Congress 2013

Four Australians recently presented posters and demonstrations at the Neuroinformatics Congress 2013. 

Events

Events